WCCW and CARLA present: Rethinking Structures Book Club

Sunday, January 30, 1–2:30pm PST
Hosted by: WCCW and CARLA
Free

The Rethinking Structures Book Club will focus on the intersections of social justice and art world justice. We will use art as a gateway into social justice, and social justice as a lens to rethink the art world. Each guest is a leader in the L.A. art community and will select a reading to present and discuss with the group. Together, we will discuss pathways forward that focus on community and care. The first session of this four-part program will feature Ceci Moss, and discuss As Radical, As Mother, As Salad, As Shelter: What Should Art Institutions Do Now?

As radical, as mother, as salad, as shelter: What should art institutions do now? compiles responses to a survey distributed to curators, museum directors, artists, and writers in the wake of Trump’s election to office,  and it asks big picture questions about the role and value of art institutions during a crisis. One question in the survey is simply “How can art institutions be better?” As we move into a new presidency and new year in 2021, I’m hoping we can revisit this text as a jumping point to imagine new, visionary forms of arts organizations, going far beyond “better” into the entirely revolutionary.” –Ceci Moss 

Ceci Moss is a curator, writer and educator based in Los Angeles, USA. She is the founder of Gas, a mobile, autonomous, experimental and networked platform for contemporary art. Her academic research addresses contemporary internet-based art practice and network culture. Her first book Expanded Internet Art: Twenty-First Century Artistic Practice and the Informational Milieu is released through the Bloomsbury series International Texts in Critical Media Aesthetics. Her writing has appeared in Rhizome, Art in America, ArtAsiaPacific, Artforum, The Wire, CURA, New Media & Society and various art catalogs. Previously, she was Assistant Curator of Visual Arts at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, the Senior Editor of the art and technology non-profit arts organization Rhizome, and Special Projects Coordinator at the New Museum. She is currently a Lecturer in Curatorial Practice at California College of the Arts and she has held teaching positions at University of Southern California, Scripps College, the San Francisco Art Institute and New York University.

Upcoming Events:

Saturday, February 27, 1–2:30pm PST
Hosted by: WCCW and CARLA
Free

The Rethinking Structures Book Club will focus on the intersections of social justice and art world justice. We will use art as a gateway into social justice, and social justice as a lens to rethink the art world. Each guest is a leader in the L.A. art community and will select a reading to present and discuss with the group.

The second session is led by Nikita Gale, an LA-based artist whose recent work considers the role of audience as a social arena and examines the ways in which silence and noise function as political positions and conditions. Gale will be leading a discussion on the Foreword to June Jordan’s Civil Wars, which they read once a season: “It’s a perfect summation of everything she was about: standing up after getting your asskicked; not being annihilated by sexism, racism, and homophobia; remembering to imagine what it is that you want.”

Nikita Gale is an artist living and working in Los Angeles, California. Gale holds a BA in Anthropology with an emphasis in Archaeological Studies from Yale University and earned an MFA in New Genres at UCLA. Gale’s practice is often structured by long-term obsessions with specific objects and the ways these objects gesture towards particular social and political histories. Gale uses ubiquitous consumer technologies as frameworks to consider how individuals potentially reproduce their relationships to objects within their relationships to psychic space and political, social, and economic systems. For Gale, the term “reproduction” is as much a mechanical, technical process as it is a process rooted in sex, biology and the organic. Gale’s recent work considers the role of audience as a social arena and examines the ways in which silence and noise function as political positions and conditions.

Nikita’s work has recently been exhibited at MoMA PS1 (New York); LACE (Los Angeles); Commonwealth and Council (Los Angeles); Matthew Marks Gallery (Los Angeles); The Studio Museum in Harlem (New York); Rodeo Gallery (London); Ceysson & Benetiere (Paris); and in “Made in L.A. 2018” at the Hammer Museum (Los Angeles). Gale’s work has appeared in numerous publications including The New York Times, Artforum, Art in America, Art21, AQNB, Frieze, Vogue, and Flash Art. Nikita currently serves on the Board of Directors for GREX, the west coast affiliate of the AK Rice Institute for the Study of Social Systems.